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Revised 9/7/2017 11:21 AM

 EAST HARTFORD PUBLIC SCHOOLS

STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT ­

PART A: INTRODUCTION OF THE EAST HARTFORD PUBLIC SCHOOLS (EHPS) STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT (SCC)

PHILOSOPHY

EHPS is committed to the work of developing schools that are the pride of our community.  Our mission starts with the delivery of a high quality learning experience for every child, every day.  On a daily basis, we believe that our words, decisions and efforts transform students’ lives.  In this transformative process, we commit as a learning institution to work tirelessly to help all students’ progress on their personal journey in terms of academic and social emotional learning.  We believe that to reach the mind of our students, we first must engage their hearts, and that teaching our students how to best manage and exhibit appropriate behaviors is a primary teaching task for all EHPS staff.  This SCC is grounded in the learning philosophy that student discipline is the process of teaching behavior and building skills rather than simply punishing outcomes.  We believe in “kids first, kids second and kids third,” and that by working together, we can help all our students succeed.

DESCRIPTION

The SCC is a document meant to be used by students, families, and administration/staff to provide a consistent and predictable understanding of the EHPS approach to developing social emotional skills, teaching behavior, promoting positive relationships, and administering consequences.  The SCC is not intended to be a step-by-step protocol, but rather a guide for helping students navigate through challenging situations while supporting a safe school community.  The SCC should not be viewed as a manual for how to discipline a child, but rather an aligning document for how adults can work together to support our students through their most challenging moments.  In turn, the SCC offers limits on appropriate, logical consequences, and more importantly focuses on the full array of interventions available to redirect and teach students to succeed. Please note that every situation presents a unique set of circumstances, context, and histories that must be contemplated and reflected in the decision making process.  In light of the individualized nature of student learning, this SCC provides appropriate flexibility and discretion when working with children. 

The EHPS SCC was written in accordance with the EHPS Board of Education (BoE) policies by the SCC Task Force members including the superintendent, central office staff, administrators, teachers, social workers, psychologists, and school resource officers.  

CONNECTING TO SCHOOL CLIMATE AND CULTURE

Stepping back from the policy guidelines of this document, it is imperative to recognize and highlight the role of a positive school climate and culture as a cornerstone of student learning.  Without this positive school climate and culture, learning is impossible.  The SCC is an integral part of establishing and maintaining positive school climates and cultures across the district by providing the expectations, guidance and structure for adult decision making in response to student behavior.  The EHPS SCC is designed to promote schools with the following core tenets of a positive climate and culture: 

  • Effective leadership that creates and communicates clear expectations and is accessible and supportive of school staff and staff development
  • Positive relationships with all stakeholders—students, parents, teachers/staff, school police, and community partners
  • Training and resources to resolve conflicts peacefully and respectfully, with suspensions used only as a disciplinary measure of last resort
  • Supports for students who are experiencing emotional crisis, trauma, or serious challenges in their homes or communities
  • Engaging academic and extracurricular activities for students that meet behavioral, developmental, and academic needs
  • Effective communication among schools, parents, and communities
  • Clean, well-maintained, and welcoming environments that clearly demonstrate school pride and a love of learning
  • A learning environment where students and staff feel physically and emotionally safe 

RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

All members of the school community, including students, parents and guardians, principals, school staff, and the district office, have rights and responsibilities that support a safe school community. The success of our students is dependent on the entire EHPS community and the varied roles they play along a student’s journey.  Identifying and recognizing the rights and responsibilities of each stakeholder in this formative process requires clear communication and follow through. 

These rights and responsibilities are described below:

Student Rights
  • To receive a free high-quality public education
  • To be safe at school
  • To be treated fairly, courteously, and respectfully
  • To bring complaints or concerns to the school administration or staff for resolution
  • To tell his/her side of the story before receiving a consequence
  • To be told the reason(s) for any disciplinary action verbally and in writing
  • To receive time devoted to physical exercise not less than 20 minutes total in a regular school day for elementary school students
Student Responsibilities
  • To respect all members of the school community
  • To maintain a positive school climate by being responsible, respectful, and cooperative
  • To understand and comply with all district and school rules and policies, outlined in the SCC and Student Handbook
  • To behave in a manner that focuses on academic success such as attending school daily, preparing for class, and completing class and homework assignments to the best of his/her ability
  • To be responsible and accountable for following school rules and instructions given by the school principal, teachers, and other staff
  • To tell school staff about any dangerous behavior or bullying that occurs at school, on the way to and from school, or in the school community
Parent/Guardian Rights
  • To be actively involved in their child’s education
  • To be treated fairly and respectfully by the EHPS administration, teachers, and other staff
  • To access information about  BoE policies and procedures
  • To be notified promptly if their child is disciplined for inappropriate or disruptive behavior and informed of the consequences assigned
  • To receive information about their child’s academic and behavioral progress
  • To be provided with translation and interpretation services
Parent/Guardian Responsibilities
  • To maintain a positive school climate by being responsible, respectful, and cooperative with all members of the school community
  • To read and become familiar with this SCC and Student Handbook
  • To recognize and understand that school staff must enforce school rules
  • To make sure their child attends school regularly, on time and prepared, and to notify the school of absences
  • To provide the school with accurate and current contact information
  • To tell school staff about academic/behavioral concerns or complaints respectfully and in a timely manner
  • To talk with their child about the behavior expected in school to foster academic success
  • To motivate their child to live up to the expectations through positive reinforcement
  • To respect other students’ privacy rights
School Administration/Staff Rights
  • To work in a safe and orderly environment
  • To be treated courteously and respectfully
  • To bring complaints or concerns to school/district administration
  • To receive supportive professional development and resources for how to better meet the needs of all students specifically connected to social  emotional learning
School Administration/Staff Responsibilities
  • To respect all members of the school community and treat everyone fairly
  • To explicitly teach, re-teach and model clear behavioral expectations to all students using positive reinforcement
  • To actively supervise all areas of the school building and use positive strategies to redirect behavior
  • To provide engaging learning activities that minimize opportunities for disruption
  • To identify and respond effectively to students’ social, emotional, and/or behavioral health needs, including referring students for additional support when necessary
  • To intervene early and de-escalate inappropriate behaviors
  • To communicate proactively to parents as well as other school staff when assistance is needed to address academic or social/emotional needs/concerns
  • To apply the SCC accurately and consistently, including providing students with opportunities to respond, notifying parent/guardians when disciplinary action is taken, and recording all disciplinary actions in PowerSchool

PART B: OPERATIONAL PROTOCOLS 

APPLICATION

The SCC applies to students at all times while they are on EHPS property, including buses, at any school-sponsored activity, including field trips, and while traveling to and from school or any school-sponsored activity. Other incidents that occur off school grounds are generally not addressed.  However, we recognize that some incidents that occur off school grounds may seriously affect school safety and school climate. In those cases, and in accordance with state law, EHPS may implement intervention or disciplinary responses based on their impact on school safety and school climate.

 

KEY FACTORS IN MAKING DISCIPLINARY DECISIONS

When determining consequences for students’ disruptive behavior, the following are important factors of consideration in ensuring that a disciplinary response is appropriate

  1. Age, health, and disability or special education status of the student;
  2. Prior conduct and record of behavior of the student; 
  3. Previous interventions with the student;
  4. Student’s willingness to repair the harm; and
  5. Seriousness of the incident and degree of harm caused. 

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

EHPS recognizes that additional steps must be taken when students with disabilities are disciplined. The SCC requires principals and school staff to follow BoE policies, EHPS administrative guidelines and state and federal laws concerning the discipline of students with disabilities, including procedures for determining manifestation (that is, whether the behavior is linked to a student’s disability), conducting Functional Behavioral Assessments and developing Behavioral Intervention Plans. EHPS is committed to reducing the disproportionate number of suspensions given to students with disabilities.

 

COMMITMENT TO NONDISCRIMINATION

EHPS is committed to using the SCC fairly and without discrimination based on a student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP), 504 plan, race, ethnicity, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, or religion.

 

DEFINITIONS OF DISCIPLINARY RESPONSES

When students are disruptive or act inappropriately, school staff and principals should respond rationally, appropriately, and consistently. The SCC describes five levels of possible response to inappropriate and disruptive behavior.

  • Classroom level/Interventions: These interventions are an educator’s decision in response to a student who is disrupting or disengaging from the educational process in the classroom.  The aim of these interventions is to quickly teach and correct behavior so students can learn and demonstrate safe and respectful behavior within the learning environment.  Educators are encouraged to try a variety of teaching and classroom management strategies for an extended period of time and document the results
  • Removal from Class: Removal from class is an educator level decision in response to a student causing a serious disruption of the educational process within the classroom.   In the case of removal, the student must be sent to a designated area and the educator must inform the building administrator of the name of the student and the reason for removal.  It is the expectation that the staff member who makes the decision to remove the child from class communicates the circumstances with the parent/guardian the day of the removal.  If a removal from class results in more than 90 minutes, the discipline must be reported as an In School Suspension. 
  • Loss of Privilege/Social Probation:  Loss of Privilege/Social Probation is a response to a student infraction where an educator/administrator removes the rights and privileges of a student to attend a school- sponsored event.  Loss of Privilege/Social Probation may have a range of severity in alignment to the infraction from loss of a classroom activity to the loss of privilege to attend a school- sponsored function.  For elementary students, removal from recess is never an option.   
  • In School Suspension (ISS):  An ISS is an administrative level decision in response to a student infraction significantly disrupting the learning environment resulting in the student being held outside of the classroom for more than 90 minutes.  The ISS must be recorded in PowerSchool and communicated to parents by the administrator. 
    • All suspensions shall be In-School Suspensions unless the administration determines that the student being suspended poses such a danger to persons or property or such a disruption of the educational process that the student must be suspended out of school.
    • School administration may not suspend students ISS more than 15 times in a school year or for a total of more than fifty days without the more formal procedures required for an expulsion. 
  • Out of School Suspension (OSS): An OSS is an administrative level decision in response to a significant level of disruption that is deemed dangerous/disruptive to the educational environment.  During the period of OSS a student is not permitted to be on school property nor attend any school- sponsored events.  The OSS must be recorded in PowerSchool and communicated to parents by the administrator.  OSS is limited to no more than ten days (when school is in session) at a time and may not extend beyond the school year in which the exclusion was imposed (Conn. Gen. Stat 10-233).
    • A student in grades preschool to two may only be given an Out of School Suspension if it is determined by the administration that such suspension is appropriate based on evidence that the student’s conduct on school grounds is of a violent or sexual nature that endangers persons.
    • School administration may not suspend students OSS more than 10 times in a school year or for a total of more than fifty days without the more formal procedures required for an expulsion. 
    • An OSS may also be appropriate based on evidence of previous disciplinary problems that have led to suspensions or expulsion of the student and efforts by the administration to address such disciplinary problems through means other than Out of School Suspension or Expulsion, including positive support strategies.
    • PA 15‐96 limited OSS and Expulsions of students in grade two and below to offenses that are violent, sexual in nature, or those that endanger others.
  • Expulsion: An expulsion is defined as an exclusion from school privileges for any student in grades three to twelve for more than ten (10) consecutive school days including, but not be limited to, exclusion from the school.   The expulsion process is a formal hearing process where members of the Board of Education vote and approve the final disciplinary decision. (BoE Policy 5114.j, Conn. Gen. Stat 10-233.c)
    • An expulsion period may extend beyond the school year in which the exclusion was imposed, up to one calendar year. 

STUDENT AND PARENT DUE PROCESS RIGHTS WITH RESPECT TO SUSPENSIONS

Listed below are the procedures that must be followed in cases of suspension. 

  1. Parents must be provided written notification any time their children are removed from the school for disciplinary reasons. Diligent efforts should also be made to contact parents by telephone.
  2. Students are entitled to a conference with the principal and school staff when they are removed from the classroom or school for disciplinary reasons.
  3. Students must be given an opportunity to tell their side of the story before a placement decision is made for either In School or Out of School Suspension.
  4. Students are entitled to make up classwork for full credit and without penalty when they are excluded from school. Each school shall assign a school staff liaison between the suspended student and his or her teachers to support this process. Teachers are required to provide students all daily classwork and assignments and must correct and return all completed work to students on a weekly basis. Students are responsible for completing make-up work in a timely manner.
  5. Additional questions about suspensions should be directed to the school’s principal.
  6. Student will complete the identified re-entry process upon returning to school. 

STUDENT AND PARENT DUE PROCESS RIGHTS WITH RESPECT TO EXPULSIONS

The Pupil Personnel Services Department represents the Superintendent in processing expulsion decisions. The school must submit a written Superintendent’s inquiry when recommending an expulsion. Following the submission of this report, a conference will be held between the school personnel (BoE Policy 5114.j) within 10 school days of the first day of removal. In accordance with BoE policy, students and parents have a right to appeal an extended suspension (longer than 10 days) or expulsion decision after this conference has occurred.

 

Students with disabilities cannot be expelled without an IEP or 504 team meeting, as appropriate, at which a manifestation determination is made. Students with disabilities shall not be removed from school for behaviors that are deemed a manifestation of their disability.

 

If you have any additional questions regarding expulsion procedures, please call the EHPS Director of Pupil Personnel Services at (860) 622-5110.

 

PART C: LEVELS OF OFFENSES

DESCRIPTION OF LEVELING SYSTEM

The EHPS SCC organizes student offenses into five distinct levels ranging from minor acts of misconduct (Level I) to the most significant and potentially illegal acts of misconduct (Level V).  For each of these levels, a brief description, suggestions for intervention and protocols for response are provided to guide EHPS staff and administration in making decisions.  As previously stated in this document, the decision to level acts of student misconduct may be modified based on the context and specific needs of the student.  It is important to note that the levels of offenses are designed to limit, rather than assign, the severity of the discipline for an infraction.  Thus, the available interventions and consequences of lower levels are available to subsequent levels.

LEVEL I OFFENSES

Level I offenses are low level rule violations and minor acts of misconduct that disrupt the orderly operation of the classroom, a school function, extracurricular/co-curricular program or district transportation.  Level I offenses are typically handled by the EHPS staff member who observes the student committing the offense and are seen as learning opportunities requiring a direct conversation, reminder or minor discipline to correct.

Suggested Level I interventions are:

  • Teacher/student conversation and or private conference
  • Student redirection (preferential seating, proximity, cue card, etc.)
  • De-escalation strategy
  • Mediation
  • Parent contact/conference
  • Classroom level loss of privileges
  • Teacher level detention

If the Level I behavior(s) persists, the staff member may seek support from the school administrator or school support staff regarding an intervention that would best change the student’s behavior. Suspension is not an available disciplinary response for Level I violations.

LEVEL II OFFENSES

Level II offenses are more serious acts of misconduct than Level I offenses. Level II includes acts of misconduct from Level I and acts directed against people or property that do not seriously endanger the health or safety of others.    Level II offenses typically call for additional interventions beyond those required in Level I.  These interventions must include parental contact and may include the engagement of various school and community supports to develop plans to improve student decision making. If appropriate, Level II offenses may be referred to EHPS administration for low level disciplinary consequences.

Suggested Level II interventions are:

  • All level I interventions
  • 1:1 counseling (teacher/support staff/parent)
  • Referral to Student Support Center
  • Parent/Team conference (including appropriate support staff)
  • SRBI Behavioral Process
  • Community/Restorative Circle
  • School/Community Service
  • Referral to outside services as appropriate
    • Referral to Attendance Review Board
    • Referral to Behavioral Health Supports
  • Administrative level detention(s)

For level II interventions, EHPS staff should provide the student with the opportunity to share their perspective about their misconduct as well as contact the parent/guardian regarding the student action and according plan/discipline.  Suspension is not an appropriate disciplinary response for Level II violations.

LEVEL III OFFENSES

Level III offenses are major acts of misconduct that include repeated serious disruptions of school order and/or threats to the health, safety, and property of others. Level III offenses require administrative intervention and support.  In addition to all interventions applied in Levels I-II, administrators must utilize the due process protocols spelled out in BoE policy 5114.5.  When a Level III offense occurs, EHPS staff should refer the student to an administrator as quickly as possible with a detailed description of the misconduct.  In addition to appropriate levels of support and intervention, Level III offenses may require administrative discipline up to In School Suspension. 

Suggested Level III interventions are:

  • All Level I-II interventions
  • Referral to outside services as appropriate
  • Loss of Privilege/Social Probation
  • All discipline up to In School Suspension 

For level III interventions, EHPS administrators should provide the student with the opportunity to share their perspective about their misconduct as well as contact the parent/guardian regarding the student action and according plan/discipline.  Out of School Suspension is not an appropriate disciplinary response for Level III violations.

LEVEL IV OFFENSES

Level IV offenses are a significant act of misconduct that disrupt school order, and/or injures the health, safety, and property of others. Level IV offenses require administrative intervention and support.  In addition to all interventions applied in Levels I-IIII, administrators must utilize the due process protocols spelled out in BoE policy 5114.5.  When a Level IV offense occurs, EHPS staff should refer the student to an administrator as quickly as possible with a detailed description of the misconduct.  In addition to appropriate levels of support and intervention, Level IV offenses may require administrative discipline up to Out of School Suspension for no more than five days. 

Suggested Level IV interventions are:

  • All Level I-III interventions
  • Referral to outside services as appropriate
  • All discipline up to five days of Out of School Suspension 

For Level IV interventions, EHPS administrators should provide the student with the opportunity to share their perspective about their misconduct as well as contact the parent/guardian regarding the student action and according plan/discipline.  Out of School Suspension of more than five days is not an appropriate disciplinary response for Level IV violations.

LEVEL V OFFENSES

Level V offenses are the most significant and potentially illegal act of misconduct that disrupt school order, and/or injures the health, safety, and property of others. These acts may include behavior that is illegal and dangerous. Level V offenses require administrative intervention and support.  In addition to all interventions applied in Levels I-IV, administrators must utilize the due process protocols spelled out in BoE policy 5114.5.  When a Level V offense occurs, EHPS staff should refer the student to an administrator as quickly as possible with a detailed description of the misconduct.  In addition to appropriate levels of support and intervention, Level V offenses may require administrative discipline of an Out of School Suspension of six days or more, as well as a referral for expulsion from school.  In addition, for specific Level V offenses, EHPD should be notified and alerted for potential arrest.

Suggested Level V interventions are:

  • All Level I-IV interventions
  • Six days or more Out of School Suspension
  • Referral for Expulsion
  • Notification of EHPD
    • Law Enforcement Referral to Diversionary Program
    • Law Enforcement Mentoring
    • Law Enforcement ticket/fine

For Level V interventions, EHPS administrators should provide the student with the opportunity to share their perspective about their misconduct as well as contact the parent/guardian regarding the student action and according plan/discipline.  Out of School Suspension of six days or more, referral for expulsion and notification of EHPD are appropriate disciplinary responses for Level V violations. 

PART D: DISCIPLINE CODES AND DEFINITIONS

DESCRIPTION

The EHPS SCC organizes disciplinary infractions into three major categories of policy violations, safety violations and attendance violations.  These infractions were identified through a careful analysis of nearly 2,500 EHPS disciplinary infractions over the course of school years 2015-2017.  The following table provides the State of Connecticut discipline code label, infraction name and district assigned description.  For each infraction, the SCC provides a leveling window limiting the severity of consequence.  As previously stated, this leveling table should not be seen as a decision-making manual but rather a guiding document from which to make an informed, supportive and appropriate decision regarding the assignment of a consequence. 

Policy Violations

Code 

Infraction

Description

Level 

OK Under 15-96

1410

Theft/stealing

The unlawful taking of personal or school property.

2-5

No

3500

Vandalism

Willful destruction or defacement of property (personal, school) valued at $50 or more (destroying cell phone, destroying technology, spray painting walls).

3-5

No

3510

Destruction of personal property

The destruction of personal property such as clothing, a book bag, etc.,  less than $50 value

1-2

No

3601

Insubordination/ disrespect

Unwillingness to submit to authority, refusal to respond to a reasonable request, or other situation in which a student is disobedient.

1-4

No

3604

Cheating

As related to test taking, homework or other educational situations.

1-2

No

3634

Failure to attend detention or ISS

Failure to serve assigned discipline.

1-4

No

3638

Dress code violation

Intentional and/or repeated violation of BoE dress code violation

1-2

No

3644

Accumulation of detentions

Repeated level I or level ll behaviors that have been previously addressed with interventions/minor disciplinary consequences (accumulation of referrals).

2-3

No

3653

False Information/lying

Intentionally providing false information/lying/forgery

1-4

No

3654

Selling “stuff”

Inappropriate sale of candy, cookies, or other materials (does not include drugs, prescription drugs, stolen property or other contraband).

2-3

No

3671

Cell phone violation

Violation of technology policy: Inappropriate use of cell phone

1-2

No

3674

Tape recorder/ recording device

Videotaping or recording another student or staff member without permission

1-5

No

3685

Misuse of hall pass

Using a hall pass for reasons other than its designated purpose.

1-3

No

Safety Violations

Code

Infraction

Description

Level

OK Under 15-96

1100

Arson

Arson is defined for the purpose of this report as the reckless destruction or damage to a building or other school property by intentionally starting a fire or causing an explosion. When fireworks or other incendiary devices are a contributing factor, then the weapon type used must be reported.

5

Yes

1110

Reckless Burning

A person is guilty of reckless burning when he intentionally starts a fire or causes an explosion, and thereby recklessly places a building in danger of destruction or damage. Lighting paper on fire, a garbage can fire, setting a person’s personal property on fire etc.

5

Yes

1420

Robbery

The taking or attempting to take, anything of value that is owned by another person or organization under confrontational circumstances using force, fear or the threat of violence. For example, threatening to beat up a student if he does not give up his lunch money. Note: The difference between robbery and theft is that in a robbery, the victim is present and there is either the threat of or actual physical harm.

4-5

Yes

1700

Fighting/altercation/physical aggression

Participation in an incident involving physical confrontation in which one or all participants receives at least some type of minor physical injury (black eye, bloody nose or lip, bruises, etc.).

4-5

Yes

1710

Physical altercation

Participation in a physical confrontation or some type of physical aggression that does not result in any injury. This category also includes situations in which one person strikes another causing no injuries.

3-4

Yes

1711

Verbal altercation

Participation in an incident involving a verbal confrontation (i.e., shouting match, yelling, etc.). This can also be the prelude to a more serious issue.

2-4

No

1712

Inciting a fight/riot

Encouraging a student or a group of students to engage in a physical altercation through words, social media posts, written words, or actions.

3-5

Yes

1720

Battery/assault

Striking another person with the intent of causing serious bodily harm to the individual.

5

Yes

1730

Throwing an object (serious)

Intentionally or unintentionally throwing an object resulting in an injury to others.

3-4

Yes

1750

Gang related behavior

Gang related behavior/issues.

3-5

Yes

1800

Harassment (non‐sexual)

Physical, verbal, written, or electronic threats, which creates intimidation/ fear of harm.  Annoying and/or hurtfully berating a student or group of students or other personnel, creating a threatening or hostile educational environment.

1-5

Yes

1811

Racial slurs/hate crimes

An incident involving some characteristics or perceived characteristics of the victim including race, gender, religion, color, sexual orientation, ethnicity, ancestry, national origin, political beliefs, marital status, social or family background, linguistic preference, or disability.

4-5

Yes

1817

Threats of bodily harm

Police are notified due to severity of threat and there may or may not be a weapon involved (student threatening to kill a student or staff member).

5

Yes

1900

Harassment (sexual)

Inappropriate and unwelcome communication of a sexual nature or gender‐based harassment through verbal/written comments, electronic posts, and/or physical advances that creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive educational environment (suggestive comments, cat calls, social media posts, leering, gestures, or jokes; or pressure to engage in sexual activity).

4-5

Yes

1910

Sexual Battery

Oral, anal, or vaginal penetration forcibly or against the will of a person or where the victim is incapable of giving consent. Sexual contact forcibly and/or against the will of a person or where the victim is incapable of giving consents because of his/her youth and/or mental incapacity. For example, rape, fondling, indecent liberties, child molestation, sodomy, or statutory rape.

5

Yes

1920

Sexual offense

Consensual sexual contact.  There is no force or the threat of force. Fondling or oral sexual contact are examples.

3-5

Yes

2100

Stabbing

The intentional puncturing of the skin using some type of sharp instrument. The type of weapon used (e.g., knife, pencil/pen) must be indicated.

5

Yes

2700

School threat/bomb threat

Any threat (verbal, written or electronic) by a person to bomb or use other substances or devices for the purpose of exploding, burning, causing damage to a school building, property or harm to students and/or staff (e.g., bomb threat, chemical/biological threat, terrorist threat). The police/security personnel must be involved

5

Yes

3600

Policy Violation‐Arrest

Off campus arrest that violates a publicized policy of BoE AND seriously disrupts the educational process of a school.

4-5

Yes

3610

Disorderly conduct

Repeated disruptive behavior or any acts that seriously disrupt the learning environment.

3-4

No

3624

Obscene language/profanity

Use of obscene language or actions in written, oral, physical, or electronic form.

1-4

No

3626

Spitting

Intentionally spitting on a student or staff member.

3-4

No

3627

Inappropriate behavior

Non- aggressive, non-malicious, horseplay/play fighting with no intent to harm

1-3

No

3628

Disruptive behavior

Disruption of class; or causing a disruption in the hallway, cafeteria or other area of the school.

1-2

No

3649

Safety code violations

Intentionally violating safety codes (running in halls, misuse of lab equipment, pulling fire alarm, bomb threat)

1-5

No

3700

Weapon only

Possession of a deadly weapon, dangerous instrument, or martial arts weapon.

5

No

3800

Drugs/alcohol/ tobacco only

Ranging from possession/use to distribution of drugs/alcohol/tobacco

3-5

No

3701

Knife; 2 ½ inches or longer

Steak knife, hunting knife, etc.

4-5

Yes

3702

Knife; less than 2 ½ inches

Pen knife, boy or girl scout pocket knife

3-5

Yes

3703

Box Cutter

A small tool that is made for opening cardboard boxes and that has a very sharp blade that can be pushed in and out of its case.

3-5

Yes

3711

Handgun

Any authentic firearm that can be held and fired with one hand such as a revolver or a pistol.

5

Yes

3714

Pellet, BB, or air gun

Includes homemade blow guns/pea shooters

5

Yes

3717

Stun gun

A battery‐powered, hand‐held weapon that fires an electric charge when held against a person and activated by a trigger or button, used particularly by police, to immobilize a person briefly and without injury.

5

Yes

3720

Explosive Device

Pipe bomb/chemical bomb or other types of explosive devices meant to kill or harm.

5

Yes

3722

Fireworks/firecrackers

A small explosive charge and a fuse in a heavy paper casing, exploded to make noise and/or firework.

4-5

Yes

3730

Defensive Device

Gas repellent, mace, chemical/pepper spray.

5

Yes

3470

Martial arts device

Chinese star

5

Yes

Attendance Violations

Code

Infraction

Description

Level

OK Under 15-96

3632

Tardiness

Reporting to school or class after required start time

1-2

No

3641

Presence in an unauthorized area

Being in an unauthorized area.

1-3

No

3631

Skipping class

Intentionally failing to attend class without permission from school staff

1-3

No

3648

Leaving class without permission

Leaving class without permission.

1-3

No

3635

Leaving school grounds

Leaving the school grounds without permission.

1-3

No

 

PART E: CONCLUSION

The EHPS SCC is a living document that represents the collective input of EHPS educators determined to support student success.  As any document, we recognize that policy is only one small part of the solution that relies so greatly on so many individuals to help our kids.  As a point of process, this document will be reviewed, revised and reshaped moving forward as our system continues to evolve to better support student needs.

The EHPS SCC acknowledges the complexity of decision making at the school level in response to student behavioral infractions.  By no means does this policy guideline attempt to place a one size fits all approach or administrative shackle on the unique and twisting narratives of supporting students in need, but rather seeks to provide guidance, clarity and a solid starting ground for expert decision making.

When students succeed, schools flourish, homes thrive, neighborhoods blossom and communities transform.  By working together, and by viewing our work through the lens of “our kids,” we hope this document can be of help along the way.

PART F: REFERENCES

We would like to thank the references listed below for the inspiration that their plans and documents have in our effort to develop the EHPS SCC.  To all of our contributors, both named and unnamed in this acknowledgment, we offer our deepest appreciation, gratitude and admiration for helping us identify our pathway forward.

  • Baltimore City Public Schools Student Code of Conduct
  • Chicago Public Schools Code of Conduct
  • Orange County Public Schools Code of Conduct
  • Philadelphia Public Schools Code of Conduct
  • East Hartford High School Student Handbook
  • East Hartford Middle School Student/Parent Handbook
  • Memorandum of Agreement By and Between EHPS and the EHPD
  • O’Connell Elementary School Positive Behavior Interventions & Supports (PBIS)

PART G: EHPS SCC Quick Reference/Intervention Guide

Level 

Description

Suggested Interventions

I

Level I offenses are low level rule violations and minor acts of misconduct that disrupt the orderly operation of the classroom, a school function, extracurricular/co-curricular program or district transportation.

  • Teacher/student conversation and or private conference
  • Student redirection (preferential seating, proximity, cue card, etc.)
  • De-escalation strategy
  • Mediation
  • Parent contact/conference
  • Classroom level loss of privileges
  • Teacher level detention
  • Suspension is not an available disciplinary response for a level I violation

II

Level II offenses are more serious acts of misconduct than Level I offenses. Level II includes acts of misconduct from Level I and acts directed against people or property that do not seriously endanger the health or safety of others.  Level II offenses typically call for additional interventions beyond those required in Level I.

  • All level I interventions
  • 1:1 counseling (teacher/support staff/parent)
  • Referral to Student Support Center
  • Parent/Team conference (including appropriate support staff)
  • SRBI Behavioral Process
  • Community/Restorative Circle
  • School/Community Service
  • Referral to outside services as appropriate
    • Referral to Attendance Review Board
    • Referral to Behavioral Health Supports
    • Administrative level detention(s)
    • Suspension is not an available disciplinary response for a level II violation

III

Level III offenses are major acts of misconduct that include repeated serious disruptions of school order and/or threats to the health, safety, and property of others. Level III offenses require administrative intervention and support.  In addition to all interventions applied in Levels I-II, administrators must utilize the due process protocols spelled out in BoE policy 5114.5

  • All Level I-II interventions
  • Referral to outside services as appropriate
  • Loss of Privilege/Social Probation 
  • All discipline up to In School Suspension
  • Out of School Suspension is NOT an appropriate disciplinary response to a level III violation

IV

Level IV offenses are a significant act of misconduct that disrupt school order, and/or injures the health, safety, and property of others. Level IV offenses require administrative intervention and support.  In addition to all interventions applied in Levels I-IIII, administrators must utilize the due process protocols spelled out in BoE policy 5114.5.

  • All Level I-III interventions
  • Referral to outside services as appropriate
  • All discipline up to five days of Out of School Suspension

 

V

Level V offenses are the most significant and potentially illegal act of misconduct that disrupt school order, and/or injures the health, safety, and property of others. These acts may include behavior that is illegal and dangerous. Level V offenses require administrative intervention and support.  In addition to all interventions applied in Levels I-IV, administrators must utilize the due process protocols spelled out in BoE policy 5114.5.

  • All Level I-IV interventions
  • Six days or more Out of School Suspension
  • Referral for Expulsion
  • Notification of EHPD
    • Law Enforcement Referral to Diversionary Program
    • Law Enforcement Mentoring
    • Law Enforcement ticket/fine

 

  • Hartford Courant Top Work Places 2011 Award Ribbon
  • Hartford Courant Top Work Places 2012 Award Ribbon
  • Hartford Courant Top Work Places 2013 Award Ribbon
  • Hartford Courant Top Work Places 2016 Award Ribbon
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